Six Simple Habits for the New Year

Woman Texting In Kitchen

A new year brings many things, a fresh start, a year of possibilities, and broken resolutions… We often set lofty goals and envision working out every day looking cute in our gym outfits, not the sweaty messes we really are. Visions are easy, reality is usually harder. Picking a healthy habit to work toward, rather than a resolution, might be simpler and more realistic. Give it a shot!

1. Make a plan. Whether you want to exercise more or lose fifty pounds, have a plan in place. Make it simple, such as walking 20 minutes twice a week or prepping meals on Sundays. Simple is easier to stick to and gives your schedule more flexibility.

2. Add a fruit or veggie. It’s not news that Americans don’t eat enough fruits and veggies. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that about 13% of Americans eat the recommended 1.5-2 cups of fruit and 9% eat the recommended 2-3 cups of vegetables. Keep it simple: pick up a pear or some baby carrots to munch between meals.

3. Move more. A study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggested inactivity may impact health more than obesity! But you don’t have to run a marathon, or run at all, to be active. If you don’t currently exercise, work steps into your day or walk 30 minutes each week. If you’re already active, add one more workout each week. Small steps lead to big changes.

4. Don’t like exercise? Grab a buddy! Working out with someone may increase motivation; it may even improve intensity or performance. I have a gym buddy: We motivate each other to exercise and have much more fun doing it. For someone who used to be obese and hated exercise, I actually look forward to our work outs now!

5. Dust off your knives and cook a little. You don’t have to win Chopped to get a little creative in the kitchen. Plus, cooking with friends or family may improve dietary quality and enjoyment of meals. And if you’re preparing food at home you’re less likely to grab take out, right?

6. Finally, get back up again. Everyone has fallen short of goals or fallen off the wagon – sometimes many times. Life isn’t suddenly better when you reach the top, so stop beating yourself up. Get back up, brush yourself off, and jump back on that wagon. Happy New Year!

What are FODMAPs and can I eat them?

green_red_anjouIrritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a gastrointestinal illness that causes discomfort/pain, constipation or diarrhea, and sometimes bloating and gas, is estimated to affect 10% to 20% of the world’s population. The cause is unknown, but genetics, diet, and stress play a role. For some patients, a diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) has been successful for decreasing symptoms. FODMAPs is a fancy way of saying tiny carbohydrate molecules that our naturally occurring gut bacteria like to eat (ferment). Common FODMAP foods include fruit, fiber, sugars/sweeteners, dairy, wheat, garlic, onions, and legumes. When eaten in excess, bacteria eat these carbohydrates and release acids and gas that may cause symptoms for some people.

A common misconception is that people with IBS symptoms cannot eat these foods; however, cutting out three food groups, fruit, grain and dairy, is not healthy! Indeed, nutrition professionals are constantly encouraging people to eat more plant foods. The truth is that every gut is different and some people benefit from a reduction in some of these foods, whereas others show no improvement. Because these food groups contain fiber, vitamins, minerals, water, and phytonutrients that may fight disease, it is best for those with symptoms to experiment with these foods and look for improvement. In the end, eating nutritiously will improve overall wellbeing and health.

For more information, visit the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders.